Where is sufism most common?

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Orville Kuphal asked a question: Where is sufism most common?
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Date created: Wed, Feb 3, 2021 11:50 PM
Date updated: Fri, Jul 1, 2022 6:39 AM

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Sufism is popular in such African countries as Egypt, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, and Senegal, where it is seen as a mystical expression of Islam. Sufism is traditional in Morocco, but has seen a growing revival with the renewal of Sufism under contemporary spiritual teachers such as Hamza al Qadiri al Boutchichi.

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In popular Sufism (i.e. devotional practices that have achieved currency in world cultures through Sufi influence), one common practice is to visit or make pilgrimages to the tombs of saints, renowned scholars, and righteous people. This is a particularly common practice in South Asia, ...

Where is Sufism most common? Sufism is popular in such African countries as Egypt, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, and Senegal, where it is seen as a mystical expression of Islam. Sufism is traditional in Morocco, but has seen a growing revival with the renewal of Sufism under contemporary spiritual teachers such as Hamza al Qadiri al Boutchichi.

The most common opinion is that the term “Sufism” comes from the term “soof-صوف, lit. means wool” in Arabic and the common understanding is that it is named after Imam Ali’s way of life as humble appearance where he was described as dressed in wool garment to prevent himself from falling into the comfort of this world so the wool ...

The Madariyya are members of a Sufi order (tariqa) popular in North India, especially in Uttar Pradesh, the Mewat region, Bihar and Bengal, as well as in Nepal and Bangladesh.

Sufi orders (Tariqas) can be found in Sunni, Shia and other Islamic groups. Ibn Khaldun, the 14th century Arab historian, described Sufism as:

In Turkey, most Muslims are Sufi either by identification with the normative Sunnism subsidized by the state, which exalted Sufis and places the works of Rumi in all Turkish mosques, or by participation in Sufi orders as well as widespread, part-time study circles and other voluntary communities that teach an esoteric Islam.

Early history. The exact origin of Sufism is disputed. Some sources state that Sufism is the inner dimensions of the teachings of Muhammad whereas others say that Sufism emerged during the Islamic Golden Age from about the 8th to 10th centuries. According to Ibn Khaldun Sufism was already practiced by the Sahaba, but with the spread of material tendencies, the term Sufi was just applied to ...

Sufism, mystical Islamic belief and practice in which Muslims seek the truth of divine love and knowledge through direct personal experience of God. It consists of mystical paths that are designed to learn the nature of humanity and of God and to facilitate the experience of the presence of divine love and wisdom.

These are prominent in North Africa, French-speaking West Africa, East Africa, the Albanian lands, plus Syria, Iraq, Kurdistan and Iran.

Islamic mysticism is called taṣawwuf (literally, “to dress in wool”) in Arabic, but it has been called Sufism in Western languages since the early 19th century. An abstract word, Sufism derives from the Arabic term for a mystic, ṣūfī, which is in turn derived from ṣūf, “wool,” plausibly a reference to the woollen garment of early Islamic ascetics.

The attack followed several assaults on Sufi shrines in Pakistan over the past year carried out by Sunni extremists. (The vast majority of Sufis are Sunni, though some are Shiite.)

While it sounds mysterious and other-worldly, Sufism has many things in common with Christianity, Judaism, Paganism, and other spiritual disciplines. The common themes include love, forgiveness, transcendence and divinely inspired rituals. Because of the heart-centered nature of Sufism, many Sufis are drawn to the poetry of Sanai, Rumi, Hafiz, Jami, Nezami and many others whose writings transcend all religious doctrine, as well as time itself. The Realms of Reality

The form of Sufism present in Kazakhstan was originally born through the contact between Islam and the local Central Asian traditions, most notably Shamanism and Tengriism. Bifatima is ... See full summary »

A central method on the Sufi path is a ritual prayer or dhikr (“remembrance”, derived from the Qur'anic injunction to remember God often in Surah 62:10). It consists in a repetition of either one or all of the most beautiful names of God, or of a certain religious formula, such as the profession of faith: “There is no God but Allah and Muhammad is his prophet.”

The Most Beautiful Names of Allah - The Threshold Society. Asma al-Husna -- The Most Beautiful Names of God, published by Threshold Society.

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