Where does word mysticism come from?

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Kathlyn Waters asked a question: Where does word mysticism come from?
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Date created: Sun, Jan 17, 2021 1:57 AM
Date updated: Fri, Jul 1, 2022 11:48 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Where does word mysticism come from»

  • Updated September 26, 2019 The word mysticism comes from the Greek word mystes, which refers to an initiate of a secret cult. It means the pursuit or achievement of personal communion with or joining with God (or some other form of the divine or ultimate truth). A person who successfully pursues and gains such communion can be called a mystic.

The term mystic is derived from the Greek noun mystes, which originally designated an initiate of a secret cult or mystery religion. In Classical Greece (5th–4th century bce) and during the Hellenistic Age (323 bce–330 ce), the rites of the mystery religions were largely or wholly secret.

  • The term " mysticism " has Ancient Greek origins with various historically determined meanings. Derived from the Greek word μύω múō, meaning "to close" or "to conceal", mysticism referred to the biblical, liturgical, spiritual, and contemplative dimensions of early and medieval Christianity.

Video answer: The true definition of kabbalah

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The term "mysticism" has Ancient Greek origins with various historically determined meanings. Derived from the Greek word μύω múō, meaning "to close" or "to conceal", mysticism referred to the biblical, liturgical, spiritual, and contemplative dimensions of early and medieval Christianity.

The word mysticism comes from the Greek word mystes, which refers to an initiate of a secret cult. It means the pursuit or achievement of personal communion with or joining with God (or some other form of the divine or ultimate truth). A person who successfully pursues and gains such communion can be called a mystic.

The term mystic is derived from the Greek noun mystes, which originally designated an initiate of a secret cult or mystery religion. In Classical Greece (5th–4th century bce) and during the Hellenistic Age (323 bce –330 ce), the rites of the mystery religions were largely or wholly secret.

mystic (adj.) late 14c., mistike, "spiritually allegorical, pertaining to mysteries of faith," from Old French mistique "mysterious, full of mystery" (14c.), or directly from Latin mysticus "mystical, mystic, of secret rites" (source also of Italian mistico, Spanish mistico ), from Greek mystikos "secret, mystic, connected with the mysteries," from ...

"Mysticism" is derived from the Greek μυω, meaning "to conceal", and its derivative μυστικός, mystikos, meaning "an initiate". In the Hellenistic world, a "mystikos" was an initiate of a mystery religion. "Mystical" referred to secret religious rituals and use of the word lacked any direct references to the transcendental.

Definition of mysticism. 1 : the experience of mystical union or direct communion with ultimate reality reported by mystics. 2 : the belief that direct knowledge of God, spiritual truth, or ultimate reality can be attained through subjective experience (such as intuition or insight)

"handicraft, trade, art" (archaic), late 14c., misterie, from Medieval Latin misterium, alteration of Latin ministerium "service, occupation, office, ministry" (see ministry), influenced in form by Medieval Latin mysterium (see mystery (n.1)) and in sense by maistrie "mastery."

In a 2013 interview about Christian mysticism, professor and Roman Catholic theologian Bernard McGinn said that "a mystical person would be someone who's committed to the search for a deeper contact with God." A mystic, by his definition, who has "achieved that in a very supreme way."

Martin Lings, writing in an article on Sufism in the 14th edition of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica (1968), defined Sufism as "the name by which Islamic mysticism came to be known in the 8th or 9th century A.D." and stated: "It is only in secondary respects that there can be said to have been any development In Sufism, or for that matter in Islam as a whole, since the time of the Prophet". Taking this idea one step further, he writes: "The influences on Sufism from outside have been enormously ...

The best way to define mysticism is having an ultimate realization or realizing an ultimate goal. every religion has its own interpretation of the ultimate goal. For Christian’s, the ultimate goal, or ultimate reality is being one with God or finding a place with God and being accepted into heaven.

Nicholson in his little introduction to Sufism, The Mystics of Islam (1914), remarks: "Sufism, the religious philosophy of Islam, is described in the oldest extant definition as `the apprehension of divine realities'," and although referring to it as "Islamic mysticism," he still maintains the popular idea that Sufism was largely the product of diverse philosophical and spiritual influences, including Christian, Neoplatonic, and others.

The mystical methods and doctrines of Hekhalot (Heavenly "Chambers") and Merkabah (Divine "Chariot") texts, named by modern scholars from these repeated motifs, lasted from the 1st century BCE through to the 10th century CE, before giving way to the documented manuscript emergence of Kabbalah. Initiates were said to "descend the chariot", possibly a reference to internal introspection on the Heavenly journey through the spiritual realms.

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